Beneficial Insects

Fall Garden Clean-Up Tips

 

Arcana in Winter

It’s Chilly!

We’ve had our first snowfall here in Vermont and if you haven’t already started your fall clean-up it’s time! Energy for garden work is low this time of year but just a few chores will give your garden a head start come spring and make planting a breeze. Below are some guidelines and tips for bedding down the garden for winter.

FarmWait! Before you clean up….. It is best to leave some stalks, brush, logs and groundcover. Cutting back all the dead stalks in your garden eliminates food for birds and hiding spots for overwintering beneficial insects. Plants with seeds or berries, especially native ones, are essential for the overwintering bird population, so Sunflowers, Echinacea, Rudbeckia, etc. should be left standing. You know that dead ground cover you were going to cut back or that brush pile you were going to move?  Leave it and make less work for you and more cover for those beneficial insects, including spiders, some beetles and solitary bees that you want in your garden come spring!

Clean up! This may seem a straight forward task, and for the most part it is. You want to clear any foliage from diseased plants. You can bag it and put it in the trash, or preferably, toss it somewhere well away from your garden. It is also good to do one final weeding so that any seeds on stalks won’t plant themselves in your garden when the weather warms up. Take up any inorganic material, such as black plastic and stakes, so they don’t break up in your garden. Cleaning your garden tools is also a good idea before storing them for the winter.

ArcanaAdPicks - 177Divide spring plants and dig up bulbs. Iris, Dianthus, Primrose, and late bloomers such as Rudbeckia, Geraniums, Hemerocallis, Hostas, Echinacea and Achillea can be divided. Summer bulbs, including Dahlias, tuberous Begonias, Cannas, Caladium, Elephants Ears and Gladiolas, should be dug up, packed in newspaper or for some, in moist soil (as with Dahlias) and stored in a dry place. Check on them occasionally over the winter months and anything that is soft or starts to rot, remove it immediately. Each bulb has its own needs, so check out this article from the University of New Hampshire extension for overwintering details.

Get soil tests and amend. Before the ground begins to freeze, get a soil test and amend this fall, and if you need to, adding lime to organic compost and mulches. The mulch will break down into organic matter and make for a richer environment for your plants in spring and summer. It’s also helpful to stockpile manure in the fall and cover it with a tarp so that nutrients to do not leach out. You can also cover crop 4-6 weeks before the first frost with Rye, Oats, or Legumes that will condition your soil and fix nitrogen into your garden. Cornell University has an amazing tool for figuring out which cover crop is best for your situation. Check it out here!

Our Farm

Save your leaves. If possible, save the leaves you rake up from fall and leave them in a pile to decompose. Over time, this will become an excellent garden amendment called leaf mold. If you want to speed up the decomposition just use a leaf blower on reverse or chop the leaves with a lawnmower.

Protect your garden. Harsh winter temperatures and winds can do a lot of damage in New England. Make sure to mulch with 3-5″ of straw preferably but sawdust, pine needles or wood chips. Wrap fruit tress to protect from winter sunburn and rodent damage. Protect blueberry bushes from harsh winter winds with burlap to minimize drying out of foliage.Vintage Anne with some of her garlic

Plant garlic! Get your garlic in the ground before the end of October or before the ground freezes, which ever comes first. Garlic likes a pH of 6.2-7.0 and needs a cold treatment of 40 degrees for a minimum of two months to sprout. Cover with a thick layer of straw to prevent any damage from the cold.

 

 

 

 

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Posted by Drea Tremols in Fall, Garden Care, How-To, Monthly News, Perennial, 0 comments
Favorite Fall Perennial Pollinators

Favorite Fall Perennial Pollinators

September may not be the New England gardener’s most exciting month for getting out in the yard, but it is actually a fantastic time to add pollinator plants to the garden. Most folks this time of year are splitting wood, putting up food from the harvest and getting gardens ready for those cold winter months that are just around the corner. However, here at Arcana, we also want to remind you of the fun and beauty that September can bring to our outdoor spaces and pollinator friends!

This is the time of year when bees and butterflies are trying to stock up for the winter as well, collecting the last bits of nectar they can find for honey stores or perhaps a long migration trip down South! We’ve collected a list of our top five favorite fall pollinator plants that not only help these insects but also bring lovely flowers to your garden after many perennials have finished their blooming season.

actea-simplexActaea simplex (shown left), also known as Bugbane, is a lovely 3′-4′ shade perennial. It adds great architectural height to the garden and is best planted in groups. It attracts hordes of butterflies and beneficial insects. It needs consistently moist, fertile soil and is best planted where it will be sheltered from strong winds. it looks lovely planted along with our next favorite late blooming perennial pollinator! Zone 4.

Anemone x hybrida ‘Honorine Jobert’, also called the anemone-x-hybrida-honorine-jobertJapanese Anemone or windflower, is a stunning 3-4′ tall part shade plant that bears pure white, semi-double, slightly ruffled flowers with a yellow, fluffy center. It lends height, brightness and elegance to overall garden design it is no wonder that it is The Perennial Plant Association’s “Perennial of the Year” for 2016.  It may be slow to establish but once it does it is a low maintenance plant. They are helped by winter mulch in colder climates. They look especially lovely when planted with hostas and astilbes and they thrive in rich, loamy, consistently moist soil in Zone 5 or lower.

anemone-x-hybridaAnemone tomentosa ‘Robustissima’, or Grapeleaf Anemone, A native of north and central China, it is one of the hardiest anemones, bearing hundreds of mauve flowers with yellow centers on 18-36″ branching stems. A wonderful plant in the perennial boarder, cottage or woodland garden and a great flower for arrangements as well. The plant will spread to eventually create a 4-5′ wide colony; one of the best solutions for adding color and elegance to the shade garden. Prefers part shade and moist, humus-rich soil. Zone 3.

Chelone lyonii ‘Hot Lips’, common name Turtlehead, is a 3′ tall plants with snapdragon-like, brilliant chelone-lyonii-hot-lipsrose pink flowers that resemble the heads of turtles. Forms a graceful clump and looks lovely planted with asters which provide an excellent contrast of color. Grows best in part shade and may need staking in full shade sites. It is a native of wet woodland areas in the Southern United States but has naturalized to areas of New York and New England. Prefers rich, moist soil and is excellent planted in shade and woodland gardens as well as along ponds or water garden peripheries. Attracts butterflies, is an interesting cut flower and is also a rain garden plant. Zone 4.

buddleia-davidiiBuddleia davidii ‘Black Knight’ is a gorgeous pollinator with fragrant dark purple blooms that truly is a Butterfly Bush, as it’s common name claims. Grows easily in average to medium moisture but needs good drainage in full sun.  A deciduous shrub that is native to China, it grows between 6-8′ and has a bushy habit. Looks lovely in borders, rose gardens, cottage gardens and, of course, pollinator gardens! Also a lovely cut flower that brings it’s beauty and honey fragrance to a bouquet. Mulch well in the fall and cut down to 6-8″ from the ground in late winter as flowers grow on new wood. Zone 5.

There are many more pollinator plants that we love this time of year, such as New England Asters (noteworthy is its new latin name Symphyotrichum), Scabiosa Caucasia, and Hibiscus Moscheutos all of which can be found ON SALE at our nursery in Jericho, VT! Come on out and see these splendid late flowering pollinators in person! Leave a comment telling us what your favorite fall perennial is, pollinator or otherwise!

 

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Posted by Drea Tremols in Fall, Monthly News, Perennial, Pollinators, 0 comments