Garlic

Fall Garden Clean-Up Tips

 

Arcana in Winter

It’s Chilly!

We’ve had our first snowfall here in Vermont and if you haven’t already started your fall clean-up it’s time! Energy for garden work is low this time of year but just a few chores will give your garden a head start come spring and make planting a breeze. Below are some guidelines and tips for bedding down the garden for winter.

FarmWait! Before you clean up….. It is best to leave some stalks, brush, logs and groundcover. Cutting back all the dead stalks in your garden eliminates food for birds and hiding spots for overwintering beneficial insects. Plants with seeds or berries, especially native ones, are essential for the overwintering bird population, so Sunflowers, Echinacea, Rudbeckia, etc. should be left standing. You know that dead ground cover you were going to cut back or that brush pile you were going to move?  Leave it and make less work for you and more cover for those beneficial insects, including spiders, some beetles and solitary bees that you want in your garden come spring!

Clean up! This may seem a straight forward task, and for the most part it is. You want to clear any foliage from diseased plants. You can bag it and put it in the trash, or preferably, toss it somewhere well away from your garden. It is also good to do one final weeding so that any seeds on stalks won’t plant themselves in your garden when the weather warms up. Take up any inorganic material, such as black plastic and stakes, so they don’t break up in your garden. Cleaning your garden tools is also a good idea before storing them for the winter.

ArcanaAdPicks - 177Divide spring plants and dig up bulbs. Iris, Dianthus, Primrose, and late bloomers such as Rudbeckia, Geraniums, Hemerocallis, Hostas, Echinacea and Achillea can be divided. Summer bulbs, including Dahlias, tuberous Begonias, Cannas, Caladium, Elephants Ears and Gladiolas, should be dug up, packed in newspaper or for some, in moist soil (as with Dahlias) and stored in a dry place. Check on them occasionally over the winter months and anything that is soft or starts to rot, remove it immediately. Each bulb has its own needs, so check out this article from the University of New Hampshire extension for overwintering details.

Get soil tests and amend. Before the ground begins to freeze, get a soil test and amend this fall, and if you need to, adding lime to organic compost and mulches. The mulch will break down into organic matter and make for a richer environment for your plants in spring and summer. It’s also helpful to stockpile manure in the fall and cover it with a tarp so that nutrients to do not leach out. You can also cover crop 4-6 weeks before the first frost with Rye, Oats, or Legumes that will condition your soil and fix nitrogen into your garden. Cornell University has an amazing tool for figuring out which cover crop is best for your situation. Check it out here!

Our Farm

Save your leaves. If possible, save the leaves you rake up from fall and leave them in a pile to decompose. Over time, this will become an excellent garden amendment called leaf mold. If you want to speed up the decomposition just use a leaf blower on reverse or chop the leaves with a lawnmower.

Protect your garden. Harsh winter temperatures and winds can do a lot of damage in New England. Make sure to mulch with 3-5″ of straw preferably but sawdust, pine needles or wood chips. Wrap fruit tress to protect from winter sunburn and rodent damage. Protect blueberry bushes from harsh winter winds with burlap to minimize drying out of foliage.Vintage Anne with some of her garlic

Plant garlic! Get your garlic in the ground before the end of October or before the ground freezes, which ever comes first. Garlic likes a pH of 6.2-7.0 and needs a cold treatment of 40 degrees for a minimum of two months to sprout. Cover with a thick layer of straw to prevent any damage from the cold.

 

 

 

 

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Posted by Drea Tremols in Fall, Garden Care, How-To, Monthly News, Perennial, 0 comments

July at Arcana!

Our New BuildingHappy summer and boy has it been a hot one here in Vermont! We got some much needed rain this past week which means lots of mowing and weeding out in our crop fields and nursery but it also means we have gorgeous flowers in bloom and delicious crops to harvest! We have so many wonderful, organic crops growing and one of the stars of July is garlic! Garlic is one of the oldest cultivated plants and we’ve been growing it for our market stands and CSA shares for well over a decade. This year we are growing ten varieties-some for sale and some for seed. Garlic is a fun and relatively easy crop to grow. A great choice for farmers or gardeners who want to grow a crop that requires minimal effort with delicious and lucrative rewards!Eva Weedwacking

A few of our other crops currently being picked and enjoyed are snap peas, onions, gooseberries, currants, beets, radishes, mesclun, tomatoes, and cucumbers as well as herbs! July is an abundant time of year here in Vermont and we are taking full advantage of it! We harvest twice a week at Arcana-Tuesdays for our CSA, which stands for Community Supported Agriculture, and Fridays for the Burlington and Stowe Farmer’s Markets! We’ve been attending Burlington’s Saturday market for more than 20 years and Sundays at Stowe for over 10 years! We really enjoy the community, customers and connection to other local vendors through these markets and hope to see you there!

We also take many plant starts to markets and offer beautiful veggie and annual starts to our CSA Echinacea ensemblemembers! This year we grew over 150 varieties of tomato starts, over 25 types of basil starts and 120+ varieties of peppers both hot and sweet! In our herb department we have lovely feverfew in bloom as well as arnica and thyme. We also have many beautiful flowering perennial plants such as liatris, echinacea and asters just to name a few.

If you’re local, be sure to stop by the farm in July for awesome deals on plant starts. Veggies, annual flowers and herbs always go on sale this month so it’s a great time to come by and see what beautiful,organic plants you can find for half the price! Also, be sure to come back to our blog for future profile posts on our staffs favorite herbs, perennials and crops of the month.

market berriesWe couldn’t end a blog post in July without recommending a recipe, could we? Check out this tasty gazpacho-a favorite cold summer soup of ours that is perfect with July crops! Don’t hesitate to leave a comment letting us know your favorite summer recipes, which crops are growing in your garden or your favorite perennials of July!

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Posted by Drea Tremols in Monthly News